Thoughts from a 13-year-old gamer

One of the most challenging aspects of unschooling for me was letting go of conventional paradigms about gaming, and screen time in general. Paying attention to my children has allowed me to see how enriching much of this activity actually is. Each of the children engages differently with games and screens. E does some gaming, … Continue reading Thoughts from a 13-year-old gamer

So, what did we do today?

I thought I'd start some posts about what our average days are made of. I chose Monday because it still feels like a minor act of rebellion not to wake up stressed at the prospect of the week ahead. Ever since my school years I've associated Mondays with either heroic energy or a slothful desire … Continue reading So, what did we do today?

Unschooling and being a productive person..

People often ask how I get anything done when I'm with the children at home. Surely, life is too chaotic for me to be productive. Is unschooling chaotic? It can feel that way sometimes. Five people moving to their own rhythms in the same place is bound to have its moments. The absence of imposed … Continue reading Unschooling and being a productive person..

New Year’s resolutions

I'm writing this post on the morning of New Year's Eve, at my mother's house in the Yorkshire town where I grew up. We come here at least twice a year and it has become a home from home for my children. As British/Argentinians born in Spain, their sense of belonging in the world is … Continue reading New Year’s resolutions

When everything means something

Society seems to have created an odd hierarchy of children's activities which, at first glance, is there to help us parent better and ensure our children go on to great things. Sitting at the top are the worthwhile activities (reading, playing an instrument, doing a craft etc) and, lurking at the bottom, are the time-wasters … Continue reading When everything means something

Learning to read

Our sons, who are now 12 and 11, both learned to read about three years ago, when they were nine and eight respectively. When they were younger, I'd tried for a while to help them with their reading, assuming that with some gentle encouragement they would learn, but they'd pushed me away every time. I … Continue reading Learning to read